TOP 3 LEADERSHIP ARTICLES: 2.23 - 2.27

Gary Xavier is a professional leadership speaker and a former Marine Sniper who believes bold leaders should always drive exploration.  Gary works to ensure organizations leave a lasting legacy on their leaders and workers regardless of how long they stay together.  

Learn more about Gary here


1. SO YOU WANT TO RUN A STARTUP, But YOU'RE NOT 25?

Tech Crunch contributor and investor, Mark Suster (@msuster) describes the paths to becoming a startup CEO even if you're not in your 20s.  

My description: @msuster uses an unconventional example of how to gain startup CEO experience as the CEO of a  "VC fixer-uper".   Suster admits the controversy behind this move, but he discusses many benefits.  

My leadership thoughts: Limitations are 99% internal fabrications.  100% of limitations always reveal a different way to do something.  Therefore, leaders must learn to look at limitations as limitless paths toward an answer. Typically, leaders share commitment to an idea, ability to gather resources for the execution of that idea and finding new ways to reinvent the idea.  Other than that, your age should have no real bearing on your ability to become CEO. 

Who Wrote it: Thanks to @techcrunch contributor Mark Suster (@msuster).

CLICK FOR ARTICLE

2. YOU WANT HAPPINESS? DO MORE CHALLENGING WORK.

Harvard Professor, Rosabeth Moss Kanter explains why the happiest people do the most challenging work.

My description/leadership thoughts: This older and shorter article I found after my wife and I had a discussion about happiness and work.  We had just experienced two bad days, which led me on an iPhone search looking for inspiration.  We are usually pretty upbeat and positive, but that can change quickly.  We were wondering why we feel so frustrated at times when our work seems pretty meaningful (I am a speaker and she is in medicine).  In this article, Professor Kanter  states four primary sources of motivation in high innovation companies.  They are: mastery, membership, meaning and money, which came in a "distant fourth" as she puts it.  So, where were we struggling?  Where are you struggling?  

I run a professional speaking and content brand and my wife provides medical care; are we in high innovation businesses?  Possibly.  Are we in highly meaningful businesses?  Absolutely.   So, where were we struggling?  We were struggling with meaning.  Much of the work we do, at times, feels like there is no end and the target or the final destination seems fuzzy.  We must refocus our target and then start again.  Issues with other categories seem harder to admit.  Categories like money. Which category do you struggle with?  

Who Wrote it: Thanks to @fastcompany contributor @drake_baer

CLICK FOR ARTICLE

3. THE 5 Lessons From Visionary CEOs

The 5 traits from visionary CEOs like Elon Musk, Alan Mulally and Nick Woodman.

My description:  I will say this article is outstanding it it's choices of behavioral traits in visionary leaders.  Choices like Elon Musk (Tesla, Space X), Alan Mulally (Ford), Nick Woodman (GoPro), Shantanu Narayen (Adobe) and Phillip Krim (Casper) are great examples of leaders who have contributed great disruptions to their industry and company.  

My leadership thoughts: The 5 traits in this article are 1) Relentless Innovation 2) Focus 3) Resilience 4) Adaptability 5) Reimagining.  The key trait you can embrace from this article is relentless resilient focus with reimagined adaptability.  Ok, now that I've successfully jammed 5 traits together to form one trait, you can see there is value in all of these.  And, there is a time and place for them except when Elon Musk deployed deployed all five when Space X and Tesla were on the verge of bankruptcy in 2008.  You'd think resilience was the key in that environment, but Musk needed relentless resilient focus with reimagined adaptability to keep both alive.  

Who Wrote it: Thanks to @chuckcohn CEO of Varsity Tutors and contributor to @entrepreneur magazine. 

CLICK FOR ARTICLE

Comment